RIVULETS: reviewed


The profound and almost prophetic ideas and concepts that King touches on and personifies can be summed up in one phrase; reality altering

James Gordon King

James Gordon King

As the echoes of the RUSH concert resonating from Rogers Arena competed in volume with the screaming One Direction fans lined up next door at BC Place, something profound was occurring in Chinatown last Friday night.

An alternative style of theatre was being presented at the Lone Pine, which is not so much a theatre as simply an open space. It was the second night of viewing the three-part series RIVULETS, written by James Gordon King and directionally lead by Marie Farsi. By definition, a rivulet is a minuscule stream, which in turn serves as an inerrant title to a play series based on the aftermath a flood.

Well, not just a flood, more a look at human nature and our reactions when faced with such an event. Before entering the space, you and about 20 other audience members congregate in a foyer and are led to the start of the play. As the actor of the first 15-minute play greets you at the door and you take your seats, duly noted as scattered milk crates, you begin to completely immerse yourself within the world created by the two young collaborators. The three acts are done entirely in testimonial style. Yet the dedication of the actors and uncanny subject matter of the script brings other intangible characters to life. Each room that the audience is lead into, each door that is opened, each flashing light queue; all serve in unison in order to usher captivated viewers further into the universe of the play.

Marie Farsi

Marie Farsi

Although the style and execution of the show was commendable, the true soul and spotlight of the show is accredited to its content. The profound and almost prophetic ideas and concepts that King touches on and personifies can be summed up in one phrase; reality altering. We found ourselves questioning our own values due to its melancholic themes, which was undoubtedly a new experience to gain from a live performance for us. It discusses the dismal abstraction of reincarnation. It skates along the surface of the unquenchable greed and lust that are ingrained within society. And, finally, it brings to fruition the idea of facing the irreversible consequences of our generation’s vain mistakes and feeble attempts to make a change while we still could.

Each room that the audience is lead into, each door that is opened, each flashing light queue; all serve in unison in order to usher captivated viewers further into the universe of the play

Leaving the Lone Pine, Emma Osmond and I stared at each other dumbfounded while attempting to readjust to the real world. We walked the streets of Gastown and stumbled into a local pub, all the while deeply discussing what we were just part of; and that is where RIVULETS defines itself as alternative theatre. It was not something to be watched or spectated, rather something to be experienced.

It comes to us as no surprise that the duo’s second play in the series, “Sea Bird is in a Happy Place”, has been selected for the 40th Annual Samuel French Off Off Broadway Short Play Festival running from August 4th-9th, 2015.

Learn more about RIVULETS at Vancouverpresents.com

by: Lorenzo Schober and Emma Osmond


About Lorenzo Schober

Lorenzo is Y57’s Sr. News Producer. Being in charge of covering hard hitting events and local news pieces that pertain to Vancouver youth, he is constantly on-the-go looking for a new story. He currently studies Communications at Simon Fraser University and is an avid fan of motorcycle culture. Originally from the Okanagan, he loves the diversity Vancouver has to offer and thinks the Grouse Grind never gets old.

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